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. >> the fed used to have reserves and one of the changes is that now they can pay it and they look at the new tool of the interest rate. >> and number of people to put this in context a number of people have been arguing one of the problems in terms of funding investment in the private sector is that the fed is taking the money out of the system by paying interest on reserves. i think there is very little evidence that that is the case created the design of the policy was primarily to make sure that there was control over the rate to keep the fund rate is much narrower than they had been. remember that as a time when it was all over the place. it seemed to have worked quite effectively, and i think the evidence to that policy is pretty positive. the evidence against it in terms of its long-term effect is minimal. that doesn't mean that it couldn't be used to harm the private sector by taking the money out of the economy because they have discretion on the rate by which it pays for those funds obviously by the race that would be too high you could do a lot of damage but i don't think there is
neuroscience and what science can tell us about human behavior in the ways that may be relevant. >> is this on now? and honor to be here with you today. and to have an opportunity to talk to you about behavioral sciences are impacting the legal system. this morning you heard about the extraordinary roles of dna, inlysis of bones are playing identifying individuals and identifying criminals in order to cause crime. i'm going to shift our focus a little bit to talk about what behavioral sciences tell us about why a person has committed a crime. or not an improved understanding of why people theit crimes or contributions to human behavior should impact how we think about responsibilities for criminal conduct and the punishment for criminal conduct. of all of the risk factors that are most notable for the development of antisocial personality disorder that have a new mode in basis, what is the most predictive seizure is? b y chromosome. b y chromosome. being a male. is as a significant biological disadvantage. that this might be part of the explanation to us. what you're looking at
for the next ten years the report of a story of jeremy humm and allegedly used by the fbi as part of a private army of hackers and punished for going astray alarming figures in japan's radiation odd spot. this is close to the average level of the goals down with that in the chernobyl zone. only with one exception. the place where i'm at right now more than ten thousand people are currently living hard to travel to the exclusion zone the fish in about the government has vowed to make fit for habitation soon applied to some see as hopelessly unrealistic box russian police received a militant hideout leading to an intense gunfire with several terrorists dead reportedly including the met orchestra to last most people could ride bus bombing. it's three pm and off white mat as the berry good to be with us our top story this hour a cyber activists by the massive expos am the us private intelligence firm that spied for the government has been sentenced to ten years behind bars. analysts say the case that was anything but clear cut than is being described as a warning shot to whistleblowers but he's ho
the use of virtual currencies. then, a look at the process that granting security clearances for federal workers and contractors. and live at noon eastern, a heritage foundation panel on the deal struck in geneva, switzerland, on iran's nuclear program. >> today the heritage foundation examines the deal reached this it's weekend in geneva, switzerland, on iran's nuclear weapons program. watch the event live starting at noon eastern here on c-span2. also here on c-span2, a look at u.s./canada military relations. we'll be live at 1:30u p.m. eastern. >> the senate homeland security committee last week examined the government's ability to regulate digital currencies like bitcoin. this hearing is two and a half hours. [inaudible conversations] >> well, good afternoon, everyone. thank you for joining us. we especially want to thank our witnesses, panel number one, and somewhere out in the audience, panel number two. lost your id card, go around and pick it up, please, and put it where it belongs. that way we'll know who you are, and you will too. senator rockefeller, who i succeeded here in th
the government's ability to police the use of digital currency with the laws currently on the books. online decentralized systems allow people to exchange goods and services without using real money, including bit coins. this hearing is two and a half hours. >>> good afternoon, everyone. thank you for joining us, we especially want to thank our witnesses, panel number one, and somewhere in the audience, panel number two. the i.d. card is there, so pick it up please and put it where it belongs. that way we'll know who you are and you will, too. my succeeder in the senate used to say many years ago, he would say, his advice was wear a big button. wear a big button when you're campaigning so you'll remember your name and so will other people, too. we want to make sure people remember your name. over the past several months, this committee has engaged in a investigation into the potential implications of virtual currencies. during the course of this inquiry, we've examined the issues and potential risks and threats that virtual kecurrenci pose as well as some of the potential promise that some
am expert enough yet in the pending legislation to offer a specific use i will refer to secretary beers who i think knows it better. >> is that true? >> i have been at it longer, senator. [laughter] >> do you want to take a shot at it? >> as explored with senator coburn, i think what we need is for the liability protection to create the willingness for the private sector to share information about a data breach as soon as they experience it. them as quickly as possible and we can protect others as quickly as possible. protection liability is constructed -- i am not a lawyer, i cannot do find that in the legal terms that you all need to put into the law, but i -- we arewould be ready and willing to help with ethical assistance on trying to define precisely what it ought earlierlike as we tried with the last attempt to write the legislation in this body. mr. olson? >> i don't have anything to add on that cyber legislation. >> thank you. let's talk a bit about the lone wolves, american citizens, in many cases, that become radicalized, in some cases by traveling abroad and being expos
and capacity to control the impulses was virtually nonexistent. the genetic evidence was used to challenge it saying the person didn't have the necessary mental state. to provide a novel serious -- that the person's own self provoked him rather than some external person, totally novel theory; right? and try to mitigate. didn't work in this case, and hasn't worked in a lot of cases because the objective circumstances are different than the neurological evidence. evidence of planning as we ordinarily understand it by a guy, taking it to a place, pulling a trigger saying die all right. those objective things lint face a lot of neurological ens. this just tells you -- the red bar is bad for the criminal defenses. the blue bar is good for the criminal defenses. whenever you are in the room you should see a lough red. you should see a little bit of blue and the little bit of blue you should see is around mitigation. in effective assistance of counsel mitigation, and soming aggravation. in general, it's not working we again, remember it's a subset of cases. it may be more effective i
. >> that is it for us this morning. take it away, are kohcarol. >> thanks so much. have a great weekend. "newsroom" starts now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> happening how in "the newsroom," november roars in. halloween havoc as a massive storm hammers millions from maine to texas. >> the water came too fast. there wouldn't have been time to get people out of their houses. >> reporter: people plucked from rooftops. this morning the storm marches east. >>> also foot cut. >> i just learn how to survive. >>> millions of americans who use foot stamps on notice. >> no matter how people look at you keep your head up. >> reporter: one in seven of us desperately depending on this program to put food on the table. >>> plus -- >> thanks for flying with delta. >> reporter: fire up that ipod, kindle or computer. delta becomes the first airline to let you use your gadgets below 10,000 feet but there's still one thing you cannot do. >> smoking is not allowed on any delta flight. >> reporter: you're live in the "cnn newsroom." good morning everyone. i'm carol costello, thank you so much for joining m
, may not know the city. we can use it to determine who is providing bad service, good service. those providing poor service we can't partner with. those accounts typically get deactivated. >> as an uber customer, wonder how you balance supply and demand. how are you tuning these algorithms. >> at our country we have a math department. i'm a computer engineer, scientist, background at ucla before i dropped out. i thought that would be funny. i still sort of directly manage or get involved with that team. basically seems naturally you push a button and a car comes in five minutes. how do you know that will happen. you have to predict ahead of time. the right number of cars at the same time. predicting traffic. how long does it take for a car to get there can affect how all the trips happen -- >> going to leave this. you can watch the rest online at c-span.org. live to capitol hill for senate homeland security meeting on digital currencies that allow people to exchange goods and services online without using real money. the chair, democrat from delaware, senator carper. >> many years ag
. ♪ the now please be seated. hame ladies and gentlemen, let us begin by acknowledging a great friend of this institution , mrs. heather fully. thank you for giving us this chance to try to express the debt -- the depth of gratitude we owe to tom. an english poet once wrote that god is ant work of honest man. tom foley was back and more, a leader grounded indecency and , an honor to himself, his family, and this house. he did all the things a public servant should do an friendly did many of them better than the rest. ask any of his peers and they will tell you this. listen to bob dole. around the time he became called him a man of total integrity, or ask alan simpson who told you that tom can go to hell and make you feel good about going there. and then is fiercely conservative as they come, he said he wished they were republican. there is also this from president george bush. tom foley represented the best in public service and our political system. one class act tipping his hat to another. impressive, as is the sequence of his rise. majority whip, majority leader, and speaker. fairn
notice we have the scale of sheets that are on your table. they are reviews. we use them -- we review them very carefully afterwards. that is why we think our programs have improved over the years because we listen to what you have to say and try to give you the type of programs you really are interested in. we would also have another announcement. our committee will be having on friday november 15 an address addressed by ambassador marc grossman. he is the vice-chairman of the cohen group. he will be speaking about the diplomatic campaign in afghanistan and pakistan. he will be at the university club at 8:00 a.m. on november 15 so please take out your black areas in iphones. we also have another speaker. the senior adviser for transnational homeland security and counterterrorism program at the center for strategic and international studies. that will be wednesday december 4. also at 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. and that also will be held at the university club which is on 16th street in the northwest. i also have a very special announcement. as many of you know the aba standing committee i
testimony the national security agency intelligence programs in the u.s. and abroad. witnesses included national intelligence agency director james clapper and homeland security department officials. this hearing is two-and-a-half hours. >> i remind all guests that i will only accept civil the koran and only those recognized to speak will be allowed to speak andhe core him --decorum only those recognized to speak will be allowed to speak. i would like to recognize our first panel today. director of national intelligence james clapper james clapper,, deputy attorney the deputyes cole, director of the nsa, chris inglis. we will move immediately into the second panel of non- governmental experts knowledgeable on fisa issues. we will discuss possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice. i hope all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how proposals under consideration at congress would affect the nsa's ability to stop terrorist attacks. i am going to submit my statement for the record in order to ask some questions following the opening st
country, building these important utilities so we can use our fire power for the schools and the hospitals and roads and railways we need. >> andrew percy. >> there are, in my constituency, sure to be over 100 wind turbines and 30 or 40 in the planning system. these turbines are paid for by my constituents but not restricteded to concreting jobsn my constituency. can he assure changeses to green subsidies, that the jobs in that sector of energy are actually here in the united kingdom? >> well, i know how hard my honorable friend has worked with other mps on a cross-party basis across the region to try to attract investment into our country and we should continue to target that investment. >> will the prime minister join me paying tribute to the positive role played by trade unions in the work of the automotive council which has brought the renaissance in the u.k. car industry? >> i think the automotive council has been extremely successful. where trade unions play a positive role i will be the first to praise them but where, where, frankly, where frankly we have a real problem with a rogue
joining us have a great night. we'll see you back here tomorr tomorrow. lou: on the day that america celebrating our veterans, and honors their sacrifice for our freedoms, the united states marine corps among first on the ground in the philippines searching efficient survivors, bringing aid in hundreds of thousands displaced in aftermath of one of the largest storms the world has seen, i am lou dobbs. lou: good evening, the united states military has dispatched aid and troops to some areas that were hardest hit by typhoon haiyan. a storm check pert call, one of the most powerful in history, c-130 transplanes loaded with water, generators, foods and u.s. marines arrived in the city of ta taclabox n where they have reports of as many as 10,000. >> every building in the city was either destroyed or serially damaged. the devastation jaw drops, pentagon on stand by for any additional requests from the filipino government, and announcing moments ago that carrier, uss george washington has been dispatched to the region, the hilippines, one of america's longest asian allies und
it to a whole new level for us. >>> and premiere cast. the "hungary games" gang in new york tonight as "catching fire" mania heats up to a fever pitch. it's going to be a record-breaking weekend. and we've got the inside look. >> announcer: keep it right here, america. "nightline" is back in just 60 seconds. hey! have you ever tried honey nut cheerios? love 'em. neat! now you on the other hand... you need some help. why? look atchya. what is that? you mean my honey wand? [ shouting ] [ splat ] come on. matter of fact. [ rustling ] shirt. shoes. shades. ah! wow! now that voice... my voice? [ auto-tuned ] what's wrong with my voice? yeah man, bee got swag! be happy! be healthy! that's gotta go too. ♪ hey! must be the honey! [ sparkle ] sweet. >>> good evening. and thanks for joining us. with thanksgiving around the corner, family dysfunction is on many of our minds. but in one courtroom today it's at a different level entirely. a mother of five accused of enlisting two hitmen to try to kill her husband. but this pernicious pair, not exactly pros. no, they were family. you could call it an inside
in jakarta is a hub for the u.s. by efforts. on thursday, john kerry issued some of his brightest remarks to .ate on nsa spying during a video appearance at a london conference, john kerry conceded some actions have "reached too far." >> the president and i and others in government have actually learned of some things that have been happening in many ways on automatic pilot because the technology is there, over a course of a long period of time. >> edward snowden is reportedly starting a new job in russia today. his lawyer told a russian news agency or snowden has been hired by major russian website. than 47 million people who receive food stamps in the u.s. will see a decrease in their aid beginning today as a temporary boost from the 2009 stimulus expires. bybed the hunger clip critics, the drop will reduce monthly food stamps for a family of four $36 each month. according to the center for budget and policy priorities, food stamps will now average less than $1.40 per person per meal next year. the decrease comes two days after lawmakers opened talks on a farm bill that will likely cut
telling us anywhere from 20 to 80% of their individual business is being councils so that's a big spread and some pretty big numbers. it could be a substantial number of people getting those notices. >> host: how are employers picking the ones to cancel? >> guest: insurers are looking at this and they are saying policies that didn't exist before march of 2010 or new policies that people have purchased since 2010 are unlikely to be grandfathered. if they are not grandfathered and don't meet the requirements of the affordable care act it's likely they will get a notice. to put this in context before the affordable clean air act insurers would cancel policies. it was an unusual. they would discontinue product lines that weren't profitable for them. this is not unusual but what is unusual is the scope of and number of people that are likely to get these. >> host: consumer advocates are concerned that insurers are using these cancellations to target their most costly enrollees. >> guest: some consumer advocates are worried that maybe they are just taking unprofitable lines of business. insure
have the latest for us. >> john kerry made a last-minute arrival in geneva and gave us the impression that a deal with iran was imminent. but john kerry was also joined by his fellow european ministers put brakes on the buzz. >> we hope to try to know and narrow those differences. but i don't think that anyone should mistake that there are some important gaps that have to be close. in the meantime, benjamin netanyahu wasn't hiding his disdain for the as yet to be concluded deal of. >> this is a bad deal. a very, very bad deal. it is a very dangerous and bad deal the details which remain secret boil down to how much iran will make its program were transparent and how much the world powers and windows must loosen the sanctions. iran's foreign minister has been saying he has his own tea party to go at home in the obama administration faces sanctions either to add rrther than subtract sanctions on iran. meanwhile, in iran, president ronnie was elected to improve relations with the world and they are very few people authorized to discuss the sensitive nuclear issue. but one academic at thi
add on to the standard that is required before you can even investigate less useful tool becomes. for example, if you talk about reason to believe the number me lead to contact in the united states, that is exactly what we are trying to find out here. we have got a number. if we have a terrorist phone number, what exactly we are trying to find out is do we have information to think that this may lead to the drooping investigation in the united states? >> one quick thing, raj, if i could. on the question of follow-up, there is a very close review of the ras determination itself. what is your review of how the fbi uses the information that is generated? >> we use the information as it was indicated to further our investigative efforts so we can open up on their investigation perhaps, or we can open up an investigation. but it's the sort of review process to go and look at what was the outcome, how was it used, how do we come from or not confront an individual to the tracing all the way down to the street or to the fbi follow-up investigation. what sort of assessment or tracking is
of the president this. there. this morning he stressed the u.s. ties with egypt are vie al. i asked how the u.s. can reconcile the democracy in egypt. >> it comes down to two facts about u.s. foreign policy in the middle east. >> one the u.s. is committed to maintaining the peace treaty between egypt and israel and it can simply not end a relationship with egypt in order to maintain that peace treaty. that is where you see the material or the military parts that are still being given to the military to help preserve the security in the sinai peninsula, for example. there is also the matter of trying to enhance the u.s.' stature across the middle east. it would not due for the obama administration to cut off all ties with the country with who it's had a long standing political and military relationship because of these political problems. >> with that said one. points secon secretary kerry isg while he is in cairo, this interm government cannot exist in perpetuity. it needs to get on with the business of constitutional reforms and establishing elections for a new democratically elected president
the whole sector until they mature a little bit. rather be late and make money or be early and to use a lot. adam: i think that device shows that those who wait could have better gains. thank you very much. lori: now that has been trading a couple hours have to the underwriters feel? we will bring it in charlie gasparino. it suggests that money was left on the table? >> they were shooting at a $40 for the open but the looking at the intraday charge is interesting because it suggested opened at 45 but it really all bin dash 499 it has been down ever since. the underwriters want the price any retail or average investor that said this is playing with fire because you will not get a 45 or definitely not at 27 or 26 per you will get it at 48 and it is straight down ever since. that is the problem with the average investor playing the ipo game. i will say it again for the opening printed is important because that is what the little guy is stuck with and you don't get any shares but we should point out the amount of shares is outstanding is so small. that is a problem i think the underwriters did
bengazhi. here's how you can tell us your 3880 four202-585- democrats -- we have this question posted on our facebook page. about 1000 participants giving their opinion. you can reach out to us via ,witter and send us an e-mail journal@c-span.org. the gallup poll was taken in september. media, showingws from 1999 to the present day. they have a great deal or fair amount of trust in the mass media. goings 40% in 2012 and back to solar numbers. 55% still saying they do not have very much trust in it or none at all. when it comes to news sources and their trust in the mass media. that is the cbs news story from this week. where'd you gather news from and how do you take it in and why do you trust it? us,ou want to reach out to the numbers are -- you can also follow us on facebook, posting their opinions, you can as well. i will give you a couple of snapshots of what they are saying. when it comes to sources, out jazeera, bbc,al and public tv. you can give your sources on the phones, on facebook, or on tweet and e-mail. from new jersey, democrats line, go ahead. my favorite news sources n
, not under any circumstances. for us, they are red lines that cannot be crossed. the rights of the iranian nation are our red lines. national interests are our red lines, and that includes our rights under the framework of international regulations and enrichment on a rainy and soil. apparente the breakdown, both sides say progress has made -- been made and have resume to -- agreed to meetings next week. as we leaveoser now geneva than when we came, and with the work in good faith over we can, inw weeks, fact, secure our goal. we came to geneva to narrow the , and i can tell you without any exaggeration, we not only narrow differences and clarified those that remain, but we made significant progress in working through the approaches of how onestion reins in a program and guarantees its peaceful nature. kerry said he expects an agreement within the next couple of months. a group of lawmakers is moving ahead to tighten sanctions on iran. prime minister benjamin netanyahu continued his campaign against an iranian nuclear deal. dangerous bad and deal, a deal that would affect our survival. whe
in multiple cities friday to protest the u.s. drone war. demonstrators staged a massive sit in blocking a nato supply line. the action followed a strike that killed the pakistani head of the taliban, jeopardizing peace talks. in an interview, pakistani s accused theader u.s. of undermining peace. >> if there were a chance for peace talks, we should have grabbed it. while the interior minister did his best, i am disappoint in the way the prime minister has taken this peace pross. this should have been his number one priority. the americans could have taken him out when they wanted. the timing was to sabotage the peace process. >> clashes have erupted in saudi arabia come in cracking down on foreign workers. at least two people were killed and dozens injured after police confronted workers on saturday. meanwhile, in cutter, a human expert is calling for a reform in workers rights. they say that guest workers are being housed in squalor. in the is a stain reputation of qatar, the richest country per capita. they should not allow this to be created on its territory. there are means of making this
exercise rights of its owners and forth is a roots that only judge walton in the district here used which is the third-party standing doctrine. i would like to begin by looking at the claims of the gilardi's as individuals. several things are undisputed. the gilardi's control and make the decisions for the companies including what goes in and what's kept out of the company health plans. third the gilardi have a well-documented religious or four of the hhs mandate challenge here today requires the companies to include those things and their plans for face significant lines. and five those things should only be included in the plan if francis philip gilardi direct them to be included. given those undisputed facts it's our view that the court should have applied the test of the thomas case and asked whether the hhs mandate put substantial pressure on the gilardi's to modify their long-standing behavior and violate their religious police. the responses of course it does. they either abandon their religious belief that they can't have their company pay for these things or go out with business.
. we see it as an ambush. >> pakistani leaders blame the u.s. for sab damaging peace talks. >> murder charges laid after the shooting at lax. >>> secretary of state john kerry is in the middle east in the hopes of repairing tensions with gulf allies over syria. he will have stops in israel, jordan and saudi arabia. first a visit to egypt. this morning john kerry urged egypt to move ahead with democratic reforms, stressing u.s. ties with the country are vital. >> i wanted to first express to the egyptian people as clearly and force fully as i can, in no uncertainly terms, the united states is a friend of the people of egypt, of the country of egypt, and we are a partner to your county. >> john kerry's visit marks the first by an american official since the ousting of mohamed morsi in july. >> we have some news from sue with breaking news. you have information on the meeting with the arab league. >> yes, it's emerging that the discussions that the egyptian foreign minister and u.s. secretary of state had this afternoon included the situation with regards to syria. we are hearing from th
the light of day in america? the block buster director and sir jackie stewart will join us with that story. >>> i'm antonio mora we begin with this your health and the fda. most people know that transfats can be really bad for you. now the food and drug administration has put out a propos al thaal that could see transfats banned from the diet they raise bad cholesterol and they have no known health benefit or safety limit. to understand the significance of the proposal i'm joined by dean ornis. thiornishi dean great to have you with us what did you think when you heard this announcement today. how big a problem are transfoughtransfatsin the ameri. >> ten years ago i worked with the ceo of mcdonalds to get the transfats out of mcdonald french fries and they raise the issue that french fries are our production. and we did the same thing with pepsi co and they were the first request for that. they took the transfats out of the potato chips and that was ten years ago. it's taken time. but i think transfats are the one thing that all experts agree on. whether it's doctor atkins, but it's the wi
the senate from legislating? we have all been in congress for a long time. three of us served in the house. senator murray has been in the senate for a long time, as have other senior members of the senate. we came here to get things done. all this happy talk coming from my republican friends -- harry, we know you are right. i say, why don't you vote -- why do you vote the way you do? they vote together on everything. it is only to discourage the president of the united states. >> [indiscernible] >> let him do it. as i said, the country did pretty well for 140 years. i think we are beyond seeing who can out talked the other. let him do whatever he wants. >> will it come back to bite you when you are in the minority?3 >> what i said on the floor, this is the way it has to be. the senate has changed. look at what has happened. if we have a republican president and we think he shouldn't have the team that he wants, one thing that people don't understand -- i want to try to explain this a little try to explain this a little bit -- a simple majority is not going to be a piece of cake in every i
used to communicate with each other. that was an important insight, and is one thing that we have to make sure we do not rely on english to out there to interpret what is going on because that is not where the action is. it is in the vernacular and it is important to be there. i wanted to talk about security, which i did in here. in afghanistan or around pakistan, and libya and yemen, security is a huge concern for us. in other places while we have these embassies that are much more secure, real public diplomacy takes place outside and disease. i argue people we want to reach do not come into our facilities. that is where the value is, going into their institutions and meeting them out there. i quoted thomas friedman who came to turkey after the bombings in turkey and he looks at our new consulate, and remarked how this was a bad message. it can be or it is a difficult message out become it can become, but as public diplomacy officers, you get out of that environment. that is vital. that is why that is not such a key stumbling lock. it is very important to see these other places -
at los angeles international airport. an u.s. drone strike kills the leader of a pakistani taliban. and the prime minister of iraq asks president obama for more help in ending violence in his country. ♪ >> there are still plenty of questions after a shooting at one of the nation's busiest airports. it happened near a security check point. terminal three at los angeles international airport, one tsa agent was killed, three others were wounded. the gunman was taken into custody after a shootout. officers. the investigators say they don't think anyone else was involved. >> we believe at this point that there was a loan shooter, that he acted at least right now, he was the only person armed in this incident. >> brian rooney joins us live from los angeles international airport. brian, good to see you. if you would, bring us up to speed for the very latest. >> reporter: the airport, tony, is still mostly shutdown. occasionally a flight lands but there is none taking off. i think a passenger just passed me. there was a stream of passengers coming by on the rode way going into the airpor
willis report." thank you for joining us. have a good night and a great weekend. thank you. ♪ lou: there is a rebellion under way in the democratic party and the president's slide to the public that they could keep their health insurance if they elected is to blame. democrats defying president obama today. they voted with republicans to assure americans can restore their previously canceled plans. i am lou dobbs. ♪ good evening, everybody. president obama vows to veto the bill and democrats eager to put distance between themselves and that failed rollout of obamacare paid little attention. the 39 house democrats lined up with the republican colleagues to pass the keep your plan bill. legislation put forward by house energy and commerce committee chairman congressman fred upton that would allow insurance companies to restore the policies to millions of americans who have been canceled because of obamacare regulations democrats voted with republicans despite the president's veto threats just one day after the president's so-called fix was panned by numerous congressional democrats
and senator inhofe has helped. we have a tremendous group of people who have -- who have helped us. we will have these proceedings presided over by a military lawyer, when possible. the proceedings are going to be recorded. we will prevent victims from being forced to testify in these proceedings. they can have alternative forms of testimony instead. so these are the basic commonsense reforms. and i'm very happy to say that with the strong support we have from so many on both sides of the aisle and with the support of chairman levin, i feel very positive, but to get this done, to stop this revictimmization of people who are just distraught by having been attacked and raped and brutally hurt, we need a bill to come up and we don't need oks to moving forward. we need to move forward with this bill, and i really hope we can. this article 32 reform brings us all together. it brings claire mccaskill and kirsten gillibrand, it brings senator graham and myself. it's just a very bipartisan reform, and there are already several reforms in this bill that we're very proud of, and senator mikulski
tell us why -- you can go on youtube and you have more disclosure, more accountability, and a lot more knowledge in any of the public outcries, radio, whatever. what i would like to ask -- do you think there was a conspiracy with john f. kennedy and the corruption between j edgar hoover and a cia cabinet member going on at the same time. president kennedy was trying to break down the secret organization and all the secrecy going on in the background. he was set up -- the next thing you know, the man was assassinated. it becomes history. guest: it may be that you have been watching oliver stone's movie, too often. my personal opinion is there was no conspiracy. that is not a popular opinion with some people. i have looked into it. i've read the warren commission. i've read books on it. that is just my personal opinion. we may never know the truth, but on the face of it, it appears it is what the majority of people think that there was a lone assassin. host: back to your piece in the "smithsonian." how did you come across this story? guest: i cannot talk about that. [laughter] a source i
, and is designated a global terrorist under u.s. law. we continue to discuss security with the iraqi government, although this is only one aspect of our cooperation. political and economic tools must also be used to drain the recruiting pool of all extremist groups. we therefore welcome the prime minister's commitment to holding national parliamentary elections. the strategic agreement gives the united states a unique role in fostering democratic development. we will work with the united nations and iraqi leaders to ensure that all technical requirements to ensure freedom and elections are in place. i want to assure you that if iraq faces these challenges, it will have a committed partner in the united states. our relationship was rooted in respect and interest, as enshrined in the strategic framework agreement, are permanent and enduring roadmap. i thank you for this opportunity and ask you to help me welcome prime minister nouri al-maliki. [applause] >> in the name of god, may the blessing of god be upon you. i want to express my gratitude and esteemed to former congressman mr. jim marshall f
us at fox now doot com. be sure to follow us on twitter. that's it for this week's shows. thanks for watching. hope to see you right here next week. >>> brand-new information on the alleged gunman as things begin to get back to normal at los angeles international airport following yesterday's rampage that killed one tsa agent, injuring at least five other people and disrupting hundreds of flights nationwide. hello, everyone, glad you're with us. i'm greg jarrett. >> i'm arthel neville. welcome inside america's news headquarters. this is 23-year-old paul ciancia armed with a semiautomatic rifle, more than 150 rounds of ammunition as well as a note allegedly outlining his mission against the tsa. listen as these people describe the chaos the moment he opened fire. >> two gunshots going off and i looked at my boyfriend and he said, those are gunshots. he was like, run. we literally just ran down the stairs. >> tsa was running with us. they said, keep running, keep running. there was probably another 15 to 20 shots that we heard behind us. we just kept running. >> it was like a dream
. >> thank you, sal. >>> new at noon -- a man wanted for armed robbery is in custody after briefly escaping u.s. marshals who showed under at his door with a search warrant. that warrant was served after 8:00 this morning at a home on the 3200 block of market street in oakland. but the suspected robber still in his pajamas jump requested out of a window, leading marshalls, police and the fbi on a chase. after an hour and a half search, the suspected robber was found hiding behind the west oakland youth center as was taken into custody. >> at the time they saw the suspect flee, they were confident, he was not armed with any kind of firearm that could impose danger to the public. >> the suspected robber in his 20s has not been identified. >>> oakland police are searching for whoever set a young man on fire while riding an a.c. transit bus. it happened after 5:00 last night on the 57 line near macarthur boulevard and ardly avenue. police sources tell ktvu the victim is 18 years old and he suffered burns to both of his legs. police are reviewing surveillance video from the bus. >>> santa clara coun
ago. security has moved us to a safe location. we also have some other pictures that he has posted when everybody was leaving. he says we are being shuttled away from the terminal now. eyewitness said the shooter had an assault rifle. and he posted this one an hour ago. he said holy -- how the hell did guns get inside security. we're outside now. john has also been putting pictures up. we just tweeted still bringing more passengers into bradley terminal where we are sitting now. and he has some other pictures here. >> while we're seeing those pictures, and i'm going to come back to you, we actually have -- because you were talking about those passengers, we have a person who was on board a flight cj zoder, are you there? >> yes, i'm here. >> tell us what you saw. >> basically i'm a flight going to oakland, 27 -- it's a southwest flight. i don't know the number. there is a lot going on right now. they are going to be shuttling everybody out of here. and take us off of the plane, i'm hearing. >> have they indicated to you whether or not you would be held for questioning or taken to a
challenging than expected. warning for whistleblower us not to get ten years time but tough to break into a private company supplying database that revealed the white russians keep an eye on human rights activists nationwide. well but that on a promise to return all evacuees to the homes if the issue despite the loving radiation levels while outside the exclusion zone. this is close to the average level of the goals down with that in the chernobyl zone. only with one exception. the place where i'm at right now more than ten thousand people are currently living. due to investment capital in european he's sporting a most to our top story this morning most of serious talk to god still must be taken out of the country by the end of the year according to the adopted by the chemical weapons watched all but the most pressing question when will the thousand tonnes of highly poisonous materials is set to go then storming the times this morning. so far it looks unlikely that the country's actually going to volunteer to take it the middle east correspondent reports the organization for the pres
-handed to address the issues. >> steve saved us by holding it up. >> i have no financial interest in this. i actually can say that. a very good compendium. i would rather start on the highest end of that question where the private sector should be and touch on the comments i made earlier, which again would require a sort of paradigm shift. a paradigm shift in which we try to realize that the internet and technologies from a security perspective have differential that it's not the case the top secret computer i used to use for the government should be the very same computer with the very same protocols that i could buy in any electronics store. that makes no sense, right? it has obvious consequences in terms of moving data between top secret and secret and unclassified networks. we heard a couple of years ago how the consequence on one occasion led to the cyber net, i don't know if riddled is the right work but affected with malware. if a worm could destroy our information base. the first thing is to try to figure out what the technological solutions are. that's going to be a private sector c
>> thanks for joining us. we aappreciate your time >>> welcome to "world news." tonight coming to america, exclusive fbi video, armed terrorists living and plotting in a kentucky town. how did affiliates of al qaeda sneak into the heartland. abc's brian ross investigates. >>> tourist taken. why was an 85-year-old american veteran traveling on a tour taken captive in north korea. >>> critical condition tonight, "world news" tackles your hospital bills out of control. >> it was shocking. >> why should you pay $15 for one pill that can be bought for three cents. >>> final flight, the view on air force one, what really happened in the plane as it carried president kennedy on his last trip from dallas back to washington 50 years ago. >>> and a good evening on this wednesday night. as we come on the air abc news has learned that the fbi is on the move, investigating evidence that trained terrorists were able to come into the u.s. as refugees and slip right into the heartland. it seems they sneaked in with thousands and thousands of legitimate refugees from iraq, and there are new ima
. but if the last several years have taught us anything, it's that the majority won't stop making these demands. and if we can't give in -- if we can't give in to these constant threats, sooner or later you have to stand up and say, enough is enough. but if there's one thing that will always be true, it's thi this -- majorities are fickle, majorities are fleeting, here today, gone tomorrow. that's a lesson that sadly most of my colleagues on the other side of the aisle haven't learned for the simple reason that they've never really served a single day in the minority. so the majority has chosen to take us down this path. the silver lining is that there will come a day when roles are reversed. when that happens, our side will likely nominate and confirm lower court and supreme court nominees with 51 votes, regardless of whether the democrats actually buy into this fanciful notion that they can demolish the filibuster on lower court nominees and still preserve it for supreme court nominees. i yield the floor. mr. levin: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. mr. levin: f
>> live coverage coming up on c- span networks include earlier this afternoon discussion on u.s. foreign policy challenges in the second obama administration. ambassador dennis ross among the speakers live at 12:15 p.m. eastern. president obama continues his travels. he is speaking today in california at the dreamworks studio. you can watch his remarks live .hat 3:15 politico reports the white house is defending the president visit to dreamworks. it says the dreamworks animation ceo strong political support for president obama had "no bearing" on the white house decision to schedule a presidential visit. raiseortatzenberg millions as a bum for the president in 2012 and gave $3 million to the pro-obama superpac. we will have that live for you on c-span. , they recently announced nuclear deal with iran, hosted by the heritage foundation. canadan event on u.s.- cooperation, and that begins at 1:30 p.m. eastern. were --the 60s were different. [laughter] there were a lot of things happening involving race, the breakdown in the structure of society. i was suddenly out of the seminary
of work to figure that out. you can't use clinical terms from the dsm. that is where you draw that line from medical territory. that is what the biggest challenges. -- biggest challenge is. >> you mentioned taking reports from coworkers that observe things about people. is it of more value to have anonymous reports or to have the name of the reporter? >> i think both prove beneficial. i know we certainly have a problem in the bureau. i think there is a large sense of camaraderie between our agents that might not enable someone to be more forthright when they are reporting something. so an anonymous reporting system might work best in an environment like that where you fear that people won't report unless it is anonymous. ideally, you would like to know who's reporting so you can follow up with them. i think the critical aspect in any type of coworker or supervisor reporting mechanism is that nothing is reported triggers any type of specific punitive action. that is the biggest thing, especially with some of the psychosocial indicators and all of the indicators. no one thing is meant to
on any proposal. >> what do you think you can do? >> i think proposals, for example, that require us to count things that we are not now counting and that might be difficult to count present problems for us. if, you know, for example, i don't know if there's such a proposal, but if there was a proposal that says tell us the number of u.s. person telephone numbers that could be a difficult thing to accomplish because we don't go out and count that. things that impose burdens on us like that might be the sort of thing that presents problems for us. i'm not speaking, again, not speaking with respect to any proposal, but that's the kind of consideration we take into account. >> okay. i'm going to -- go ahead, go ahead. >> a point on that, again, not talking or addressing any specific proposal, but if we were required to for a provider to disclose the number of orders served on them, that gives the adversaries ad go ahead indicators, perhaps, depending on the relative numbers whether to use that service provider or not, and it's difficult to accept. >> if i may add to that, one thing the
, and you can always find us online at www.aljazeera.com. have a good weekend, and we'll see you at 11:00. ♪ ♪ >> the fda takes hefty action on obesity proposing to phase out all trans-fats. the move could prevent 20,000 heart attacks and 7,000 death as year. consider this while lives will be saved almost 600,000 americans die every year from heart disease. so is this just a band aid on a far larger problem? also the mind-blowing sport that requires a lot of courage and not much gear. this is free solo climbing, scaling a mountain without a rope to us non-climbers. the best free soloist in the world will tell us what it's like to climb a mound with nothing but your bear hands and some chalk. >>> and roman polanski made a film with racing legend sir jackie stewart when they were both in their prime. why did it not see the light of day in america. we're joined with story. i'm antonio mora. we begin with your health and the fda. most people know artificial trans fats apparently eye are dodgpartially hydrogenatehydrogd for you. now the fda could see trans fats effectively banned from t
a lot of courage and not much gear. this is free solo climbing, scaling a mountain without a rope to us non-climbers. the best free soloist in the world will tell us what it's like to climb a mound with nothing but your bear hands and some chalk. >>> and roman polanski made a film with racing legend sir jackie stewart when they were both in their prime. why did it not see the light of day in america. we're joined with story. i'm antonio mora. we begin with your health and the fda. most people know artificial trans fats apparently eye are dodg partially hydrogenathydrogenated for you. now the fda could see trans fats effectively banned from the american diet. it raises levels of bad cholesterol and lowers levels of good cholesterol increasing the risk of a heart attack. they have no known health benefit or safety limit. to understand the significance of the fda's proposal i'm delighted to be joined by founder and president of the preventive medicine research institute, clinical professor of medicine at university o univerf california san francisco, and author of books, "the spectrum." de
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